The pain of the others: Kabul, Mossul, Aleppo

The pain of the others: Kabul, Mossul, Aleppo

The pain of the others: Kabul, Mossul, Aleppo

English (for German version see below).

There are sentences, in conversation with refugees and migrants, which one would like to consider twice: „Our war in Afghanistan is more intense than the war in Syria“, is such a sentence. I hear it from young Afghans I have to deal with. One is tempted to deny the sentence, looking at the focus in our media on Aleppo, the most recent symbol of the Syrian catastrophe. But Afghanistan, also, has doubtlessly seen its ‚Aleppo‘. The dimension of the destruction of Kabul in the years 1992-94 may be reminiscent of what elder viewers may remember as very scarce television footage. 
What young Afghans really want to express with the sentence is: ‚We are second class as compared to Syrians in the race for integration in Germany. They prefer them to us.‘ There is some truth to this, without doubt. Afghans in Germany have no automatic access to integration and language courses supporting their integration. This has consequences for their housing and health care, for the social and psycho-social care they get. It may have to do with these facts that in recent months 25 mainly young Afghans have comitted suicide. And that this news was spoken out in public by an Afghan ambassador, otherwise diplomatically silent on comparable issues. (here)

Let us therefore look again at the sentence: „Our war in Afghanistan is more intense than the war in Syria“. The war in the Hindukush may indeed be less visible, less intense these days. But it has been going on for much longer. 30 years of war have numerous consequences on the psyche of the people, on the infrastructure of a country and on the functioning of its institutions. Unquestionably in this, Afghanistan is in a deeper state of depression than present-day Syria. One can easily notice this encounters with the people in Afghanistan, if one listens long enough to them.

The image in the German public opinion on Aleppo, Kabul and Mosul, the last IS-stronghold in Iraq, is determined by the daily news, more than by the political agenda itself. Politicians need to constantly squeeze there messagees through the filter of new agencies and social media. The result is: Afghanistan is no longer sexy. Please forgive me this casual expression. It is Syria that is sexy now.  
Mosul, actually, should be equally sexy from a media driven standpoint. But it isn’t. And this despite the fact that its civil population is suffering a struggle that is certainly not less tragic in confronting ISIS than Al Assad or the armed opposition in Aleppo. In the words of Susan Sontag: the pain of the others just cannot be viewed in Mosul at the moment. Photo agencies, internet and Tv are not broadcasting it in our homes, which is remarkable seen the attention the IS has absorbed in the media for years now. The IS itself has obviously little interest in inviting foreign authors and photographers to its sphere of influence. On the side of the international anti-IS coalition, the Iraqi army for its part is very restrictive with regard to foreign media coverage on the battle for Mosul. Protests from international correspondents, normally given a fair echo in Western news agencies, have not resonated substantially so far. In terms of the political symbolism surrounding ISIS though, there is hardly a place as important as Mosul these days. But no pictures signify no war, in the words of Susan Sontag.

To escape any discussion on fake news; The most recent bulletin of the United Nations on Mosul states: „The reports from inside western Mosul are distressing. Humanitarian partners are unable to access these areas but all the evidence points to a sharply deteriorating situation. The prices of basic food and supplies are soaring. Water and electricity are intermittent in neighbourhoods and many families without income are eating only once a day. Others are being forced to burn furniture to stay warm. (…)

„We don’t know what will happen in western Mosul but we cannot rule out the possibility of siege-like conditions or a mass exodus. To date, nearly half of all the casualties from Mosul are civilians. It’s terrifying to think of the risks families are facing. They can be killed by booby-traps and in cross-fire and could be used as human shields.“ (…)

„The world’s attention is fixed on the military campaign in Iraq. But once this is over, there will still be a humanitarian crisis. As many as three million Iraqis, maybe even four million depending on what happens in Mosul, Hawiga and Tel Afar may be displaced from their homes as a result of the conflict. These families will need to make crucial choices about how to rebuild and re-establish their lives. And we will need to be here to help them. We hope and trust that the international community will not walk away after Mosul. It would be a mistake — a very big one — if this were to happen. “
We are talking about an estimated 500,00-750,000 civilians in Mosul, who are confronted with the immediate break out of the battle in the center of Mosul. And wether the Iraqi military prefers its timetable (victory over the IS by the end of march) to a move forward coordinated under the necessary humanitarian logics remains still to be seen.

Afghanistan meanwhile is home to as many refugees and internally displaced people like never before in the past years. From Pakistan, more than 600,000 people have crossed the border, mostly forced to. Others have followed calls from the government in Kabul that seem to have a political background. Also, several hundred thousands returnees have been coming in from Iran. (here). To this comes an even higher number of internally displaced people, escaping fighting in a considerable number of provinces. To this come gang-orchestrated violence, abductions and a reality of general impunity.

In the face of these facts, the few hundred Afghans forcibly returned from Germany or out of free will, are a small number. But their deportations, for good reasons, continue to makes the headlines. The German government is trying to implement its recent agreement with Kabul, not more than a declaration of intent. In the meantime, different provincial governments have opposed Germany’s minister of interior and suggest to suspended deportations to Afghanistan for at least three months. There analysis is based on sources from the United Nations in Afghanistan. Accordingly to its mission, a forced return is not responsible.
If the agreement would prevail, it might be because two unequal protagonists are sitting at the table, with Kabul being pressured in the face of foreign aid it remains dependent on. On the other hand, let us not be mistaken about how fragile Afghanistan has become in recent years, always said to be close to the abyss.

Why is it that so? What is our share in this? Why have so many expensive programs on good governance been so ineffective in outcome? An open debate on this would bring us closer to an honest assessment of aid policies on the international intervention in Afghanistan (the final goal of which still remains unclear). In carrying out this assessment, we would be likely to approach a fairer deal also with regard to the refugees and migrants who have come to Europe.

Photography: Mosul refugees in Hassan Sham Camp, Iraq (Martin Gerner)

German:

Es gibt Sätze, im Gespräch mit Flüchtlingen und Migranten, die man zweimal bedenken möchte: 
„Der Krieg bei uns in Afghanistan ist intensiver als der in Syrien zur Zeit“ – ist so ein Satz. Ich höre ihn von jungen Afghanen, mit denen ich zu tun habe. Man ist zunächst versucht, dies zu bestreiten, angesichts des Fokus auf Aleppo in unseren Medien. 
Dabei hat Afghanistan zweifelsfrei sein ‚Aleppo‘ gehabt. Die Dimension der Zerstörung Kabuls in den Jahren 1992-94 mag Älteren über damals noch sehr spärliches Fernseh-Material in Erinnerung sein.
 Was junge Afghanen heute ausdrücken wollen mit diesen Worten ist: ‚Wir haben das Nachsehen gegenüber jungen Syrern bei der Integration in Deutschland. Sie werden bevorzugt.‘ 
Das stimmt ohne Frage. Afghanen gehören nicht in die Gruppe jener Bürger, die als erste und zuvorderst Zugang zu Integrations- und Sprachkursen geniessen. Das hat Folgen bei der Wohnungssuche und der Gesundheitsversorgung, bei sozialer und psycho-sozialer Betreuung. 
Man mag erschrecken ob der Zahl von jüngst 25 Selbstmorden überwiegend junger Afghanen, und der Tatsache, dass ausgerechnet ein afghanischer Botschafter, sonst amtsgemäß verschwiegen, damit an die Öffentlichkeit geht. (hier)

Vielleicht nimmt man sich an der Stelle den Satz noch einmal vor „Der Krieg bei uns in Afghanistan ist intensiver als der in Syrien zur Zeit“. Aktuell mag der Krieg am Hindukusch weniger sichtbar sein, weniger intensiv. Er dauert indes weit länger. Und auch das meint die Aussage. Denn die Folgen von über 30 Jahren Krieg auf die Verfasstheit und Psyche der Menschen, auf die Infrastruktur eines Landes und das Funktionieren seiner Institutionen sind in toto gesehen dann fraglos wohl tiefgehender als im heutigen Syrien. Man kann dies übrigens auch an der Begegnung mit den Menschen spüren, wenn man ihnen lang genug zuhört.

Das Bild in der deutschen Öffentlichkeit über Aleppo, Kabul und Mossul, der letzten IS-Hochburg im Irak, wird durch tagesaktuelle Medien bestimmt, mehr noch als durch Politik primär, die sich immerzu durch den Filter von Agenturen, Nachrichten und social media hindurchzwängen muss. Afghanistan ist dabei nicht mehr sexy. Man verzeihe mir die Ausdrucksweise. Nun ist Syrien sexy. Auch weil es Bild-Angebote von dort gibt, die über internationale Agenturen zu uns kommen trotz allem. Bilder, die gelesen, interpretiert und von in ihrer oft missbräuchlichen Absicht entkleidet werden müssen.

Insofern steht etwa Mossul weitgehend Teil im medialen Schatten der Weltöffentlichkeit derzeit. Und dies, obwohl seine Zivilbevölkerung einen sicher nicht weniger tragischen Kampf in der letzten IS-Hochburg im Irak erleidet. Anders als in Aleppo. Weil hier zur Zeit – nach Susan Sontag – sich das Leid der Anderen eben gerade aktuell nicht betrachten lässt. Foto, Internet und Fernsehen liefern diesen Konflikt gegen den IS nicht zu unseren Hausantennen und -netzen, was angesichts der medialen wie politischen Aufmerksamkeit, die das Thema seit Jahren absorbiert, bemerkenswert ist. Zum Einen hat der IS offenbar wenig Interesse, Bilder fremder Autoren aus seinem Einflussgebiet zu verbreiten. Auf Seiten der Anti-IS-Koalition verfährt die irakische Armee umgekehrt recht restriktiv gegenüber ausländischen Medien und ihrem Bild-Angebot vom Kampf um Mossul. Gemessen an der politischen Symbolik um das Thema IS gibt es allerdings kaum einen Ort, der wichtiger erscheint als Mossul dieser Tage. No pictures bedeutet hier ein ums andere Mal no news.

Ablesen lässt sich das unter anderem an neueste Bulletin der Vereinten Nationen im Irak von heute. Es heisst dort u.a.: „The reports from inside western Mosul are distressing. Humanitarian partners are unable to access these areas but all the evidence points to a sharply deteriorating situation. The prices of basic food and supplies are soaring. Water and electricity are intermittent in neighbourhoods and many families without income are eating only once a day. Others are being forced to burn furniture to stay warm. (…)
„We don’t know what will happen in western Mosul but we cannot rule out the possibility of siege-like conditions or a mass exodus. To date, nearly half of all the casualties from Mosul are civilians. It’s terrifying to think of the risks families are facing. They can be killed by booby-traps and in cross-fire and could be used as human shields.“ (…)
„The world’s attention is fixed on the military campaign in Iraq. But once this is over, there will still be a humanitarian crisis. As many as three million Iraqis, maybe even four million depending on what happens in Mosul, Hawiga and Tel Afar may be displaced from their homes as a result of the conflict. These families will need to make crucial choices about how to rebuild and re-establish their lives. And we will need to be here to help them. We hope and trust that the international community will not walk away after Mosul. It would be a mistake — a very big one — if this were to happen. “

Wir reden von geschätzten 750.000 Zivilisten in Mossul, die gegenwärtig im Westen der Stadt im Zentrum ausharren. Der Kampf dort könnte unmittelbar ausbrechen, wenn das irakische Militär seine Zeitplanung (Sieg über den IS bis Ende März) einem mit diplomatischen und humanitären Organisationen soweit als möglich abgestimmten Vorgehen vorzieht.

Afghanistan beherbergt – aud das man vergisst dies leicht – zur Zeit so viele Flüchtlinge und Binnenflüchtlinge wie kaum ein Land in der Region. Aus Pakistan sind über 600.000 Menschen zurück über die Grenze gekommen, überwiegend unfreiwillig. Ein anderer Teil ist politischen Eingebungen aus Kabul gefolgt. Mehrere Hunderttausend Rückkehrer aus dem Iran kommen hinzu. (siehe hier). Hunderttausende Binnenflüchtlinge, weil in vielen Provinzen gekämpft, ungestraft getötet oder entführt wird. Dagegen verblassen die wenigen Hundert afghanischer Rückkehrer aus Deutschland, auch hier Freiwillige wie Unfreiwillige. Die forcierte Zahl ihrer Abschiebungen macht monatlich Schlagzeilen. Die Bundesregierung versucht nun, das jüngste Abkommen mit Kabul zur Rückführung umzusetzen. Es steht auf dünnem Fundament, weil das Abkommen tatsächlich nicht mehr als eine Absichtserklärung ist, eine declaration of intent. Einige Bundesländer haben sich inzwischen gegen den Bundesinnenminister und dafür ausgesprochen, Abschiebungen um mindestens drei Monate auszusetzen und berufen sich auf eine Analyse der Gefahrenlage durch die Vereinten Nationen. Demnach sei eine Rückführung nicht zu verantworten. Wenn das Abkommen dennoch halten sollte, dann womöglich, weil hier zwei Nicht-Gleichberechtigte am Tisch sitzen und sich immer noch Druck auf Kabul ausüben lässt angesichts der Hilfsgelder, die Organisationen und Behörden am Hindukusch Leben einhauchen. Umgekehrt täusche sich keiner über die politische Fragilität eines Landes, dem seit Jahren prognostiziert wird, dass es am Abgrund wandelt.

Warum steht es dort? Was ist unser Anteil daran, die wir gut gemeinte aber zu oft verfehlte weil den Verhältnissen nicht ausreichend angepasste Programme von good governance den Afghanen verordnet haben? Eine offene Debatte würde uns der eigenen Bilanz des Afghanistan-Einsatzes näher bringen (dessen politisches Ziel im Übrigen nach wie vor nicht eindeutig und endgültig benannt ist). Mit ihr würden wir  auch einem faireren Umgang mit Flüchtlingen und Migranten näher kommen. Die Konflikt-Forschung, und ich bekomme das leidlich mit an den Universitäten, an denen ich unterrichten darf, unternimmt bei all dem nicht ausreichend Anstrengungen einer vergleichenden Ursachenforschung und wägt zu wenig in Frage kommende Lösungsansätze gegen bereits erprobte ab, um die daraus resultierenden Erkenntnis wiederum mit Think Tanks und Politik zu vernetzen.